A porous fabric-based molecularly imprinted polymer for specific recognition of tetracycline by radiation-induced RAFT-mediated graft copolymerization


AKBULUT SÖYLEMEZ M., Can H. K., BAĞDA E., BARSBAY M.

RADIATION PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY, vol.199, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 199
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.radphyschem.2022.110314
  • Journal Name: RADIATION PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Aerospace Database, Chemical Abstracts Core, Chimica, Communication Abstracts, Compendex, EMBASE, INSPEC, Metadex, Pollution Abstracts, Civil Engineering Abstracts
  • Keywords: Molecularly imprinting polymer (MIP), RAFT-Mediated graft copolymerization, Radiation-induced grafting, Tetracycline removal, METHACRYLATE, SURFACE, FUNCTIONALIZATION, ANTIBIOTICS
  • Sivas Cumhuriyet University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Despite technical and methodological advances, the selective separation of antibiotics from aqueous media remains a challenge. In this work, a novel molecularly imprinting polymer (MIP) with specific recognition sites was constructed by radiation-induced RAFT-mediated graft copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) from PE/PP nonwoven fabric for tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) removal. Binding isotherm and kinetics were found to follow Freundlich and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. The as-synthesized molecularly-imprinted fabric exhibited excellent binding performance towards TC, with the maximum adsorption capacity and imprinting factor of 46.7 mg g(-1) and 3.6, respectively. Moreover, it removed approximately 95% of TC from the aqueous media, also performed well in real environmental samples. For comparison purposes, MIPs obtained with conventional grafting performed significantly lower than those attained by RAFT-mediated grafting. After ten consecutive adsorption and desorption cycles, the fabric based molecularly-imprinted material retained excellent stability and reusability with a performance loss of only 3.6%, which could facilitate its potential application on an industrial scale.