The Relation of Adaptation Difficulty to Death Anxiety and Depression Among Individuals Living in a Nursing Home


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Ertekin Pınar Ş. , Demirel G.

Türkiye Klinikleri Hemşirelik Bilimleri Dergisi, cilt.12, ss.114-123, 2020 (Diğer Kurumların Hakemli Dergileri)

  • Cilt numarası: 12 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.5336/nurses.2019-70417
  • Dergi Adı: Türkiye Klinikleri Hemşirelik Bilimleri Dergisi
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.114-123

Özet

ABS TRACT Objective: This study aims to investigate the relation of
adaptation difficulty to death anxiety and depression among individuals
living in a nursing home. Material and Methods: The study was
conducted with 62 individuals living in a nursing home. Data were collected
using the Personal Information Form, the Assessment Scale of
Adaptation Difficulty for the Elderly (There were four sub dimensions
of interest: role and self-actualisation, interdependence, physiological
status, and self-concept), the Death Anxiety Scale, and the Death Depression
Scale. Results: The mean Assessment Scale of Adaptation Difficulty
for the Elderly, the Death Anxiety Scale and the Death
Depression Scale scores were 0.83±0.41, 8.61±2.97 and 9.45±4.25, respectively.
There was a weak negative correlation between physiological
states and the self-concept scores of the Death Anxiety Scale and
the Assessment Scale of Adaptation Difficulty for the Elderly subscales.
There were statistically significant differences between the Death Anxiety
Scale total scores by gender and educational status, between the
Death Anxiety Scale total scores by age, and between the Assessment
Scale of Adaptation Difficulty for the Elderly total scores based on gender,
educational status, perception of health condition, and ability to
perform daily activities (p<0.05). Conclusion: Adaptation in terms of
role and self-actualisation were generally negative, while death anxiety
and depression were moderate. Death anxiety was most associated with
physiological states and self-concepts. Specifically, death anxiety was
therefore higher in males and people educated up to high-school and
above levels, whereas death depression was higher in those aged from
58 to 70 years.