Oylum Höyük Erken Tunç Çağı Popülasyonunun Çene ve Diş Patolojileri


Açıkkol Yıldırım A. , Sarı İ.

Amanosların Gölgesinde Hayriye Akıl Anı Kitabı Mors İmmatura , K. Serdar Girginer,Gonca Dardeniz,Ayça Gerçek,Fatih Erhan,Elif Genç,İrfan Tuğcu,Özlem Oyman-Girginer,M. Cem Fırat,Hakan Gerçek,M. Furkan Tufan, Editör, Ege Yayınları, İstanbul, ss.389-402, 2020

  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Yayınevi: Ege Yayınları
  • Basıldığı Şehir: İstanbul
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.389-402
  • Editörler: K. Serdar Girginer,Gonca Dardeniz,Ayça Gerçek,Fatih Erhan,Elif Genç,İrfan Tuğcu,Özlem Oyman-Girginer,M. Cem Fırat,Hakan Gerçek,M. Furkan Tufan, Editör

Özet

This study examines dental pathologies of human skeletal materials uncovered at the Early Bronze Age levels

of Oylum Höyük, located in the central district of Kilis province. Materials subjected to this research were

unearthed between 1989-2004 excavation seasons, and consists of 96 individuals. This research demonstrates

that the population includes 31 infants (32.29%), 17 children (17.71%), 20 female (20.83%), 18 male (18.75%)

and 10 adults of unknown gender (10.42%). 428 deciduous and 953 permanent teeth are identified summing

up the total number of teeth to 1381. The dental caries, linear enamel hypoplasias and dental calculus are

calculated as 0.71%, 2.42% and 33.89%, respectively in deciduous teeth. The dental caries, dental calculus,

linear enamel hypoplasias, abscesses and antemortem tooth losses are determined as 7.94%, 90.13%, 34.01%,

3.30% and 5.10% respectively in adult individuals. Periodental disease appears in all 21 examined individuals.

Dental attrition score is found as 3.04. These finds lead an interpretation of Oylum Höyük population as

a traditional agricultural society during the Early Bronze Age mostly consuming cereals after making fine

ground flour. There is evidence about infants, which have consumed complementary foodstuffs when at the

age of 1 and 1.5. Our data also demonstrates individuals who have been exposed crucial environmental stress

affecting their growth process between 0-6 of age.